Apr 192018
 

Mark ZuckerbergIn attempting to live up to the ideals of free speech and free trade, the complexity of achieving each soon becomes apparent. That’s because in practice, neither of these ideals literally exists – even in the Western nations that rightly hold them as high virtues.

Given the best of intentions, it is highly doubtful that Mark Zuckerberg’s recent grilling before a US Senate hearing committee will actually pave the way towards any guarantee of ‘free speech’ on Facebook. His hauntingly welcome acceptance of government regulation on ‘privacy’ issues that would affect how he runs his Facebook business model may well open the barn door to the entrenchment of regulated speech – by government.

Said Zuckerberg: “Our position is not that regulation is bad. I think the Internet is so important in people’s lives and it’s getting more important, the expectations on Internet companies and technology companies overall are growing. And I think the real question is ‘What is the right framework for this?’ not ‘Should there be one?’” Continue reading »

Mar 082018
 

Pouring Steel

No good deed goes unpunished, especially if that good deed results in a win-win situation. That’s the lesson being enforced by the City of London’s crackdown on one driver who offered inexpensive rides to cancer patients.

It all began when a story broke that the city had carried out a ‘sting’ operation and fined a volunteer driver for offering a personalized two-way transportation service to these patients – because she charged a nominal fee ($12) to cover her own expenses.

Though strongly supportive of the driver, the community’s collective outrage unfortunately became misdirected against bylaw enforcement officers who were merely acting in accordance with bylaws established by an elected municipal council. That rage should have been directed at the city’s controlled and regulated taxi industry, which is the source of the trade prohibition being forced upon each side – both the driver and the driver’s passengers.

Called a ‘good Samaritan’ by many, the anonymous driver (referred to as ‘Nancy’ in some media coverage) was praised for her selfless service to others. It was widely expressed that without people like ‘Nancy’ available for those in need, the needy would have no other affordable transportation options. The outpouring of support from Londoners was expressed through open-line calls, letters to the editor, complaints to city hall, and thousands of dollars raised through public funding drives. Continue reading »

Jan 042018
 

Jerusalem

Still suffering from the Trump Derangement Syndrome, North America’s “establishment” media during 2017 continued to misrepresent the president at every opportunity. Why? (1) To discredit Donald Trump, and, (2) To cover up the real scandals in the Democratic camp, many that are criminal and treasonous in nature.

As the establishment news media continues to disseminate “fake news” as its means of opposing Trump and hiding self-evident truths, it’s always refreshing to have Salim Mansur join us for a real news update. U.S. President Donald Trump has already accomplished more during his first year in office than most presidents accomplish within their entire mandates, notes Salim.

For example, it took Donald Trump to finally execute America’s long-standing policy of recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s legitimate capital city. It took Donald Trump to decisively defeat ISIS, the terrorist group that was aided and abetted by the policies of the previous American administration. It took Donald Trump to enact the always-promised-but-never-delivered tax-cuts for Americans. It took Donald Trump to deregulate America beyond anyone’s wildest expectations. Under Donald Trump, the American economy is once again booming as it has not done in decades.

Trump has not only put America first; he is also advising other nations to do the same by encouraging them to similarly act in their own best interests. Continue reading »

Nov 302017
 

Trump in South Korea

Added to the wreckage of celebrity personalities facing public moral outrage over past alleged sexual improprieties, NBC News announced on November 29 its termination of Matt Lauer, citing similar improprieties for its response to a single complaint.

It is therefore fitting that our discussion today includes some reflections on America’s Great Sexual “Wreckoning” – our own term derived from the wreckage of celebrities and high profile personalities who seem to have exhibited very little “self awareness” about the inappropriateness of certain sexual conduct.

That discussion with Western University Associate Professor of Political Science, Salim Mansur, begins with a greater reckoning – a “Great Reckoning” that is already underway and is being favorably influenced by the world leadership of U.S. President Donald Trump.

The significance of Trump’s recent Asian tour and of major revolutionary developments in Saudi Arabia has been clouded by media distractions concerning domestic sexual improprieties by local celebrities. This may be more than coincidence, for sexuality too plays a significant role in the wider politics of world affairs. Continue reading »

Nov 092017
 

Prostitute

When people of “like minds” find themselves opposed to each other on certain specific issues, there is usually a fundamental principle or concept either missing from the debate or being misrepresented / misunderstood.

Recently, two seemingly unrelated issues have offered evidence of this epistemological dilemma: (1) prostitution, and (2) immigration.

On the prostitution front, the recent murder of sex worker Josie Glenn in London, Ontario, has renewed the local debate about prostitution and the sex trade. On one side of the debate are anti-sex feminists, as represented by Megan Walker of the London Abused Women’s Center. On the other side are pro-sex feminists as well as the women who work as sex workers (as represented by Safe Space).

Is prostitution best defined simply as “sex for money” or as something that is “intrinsically violent”? Are these views of prostitution contradictory or are they simply differing perspectives on the same activity? It’s an unusual divide: feminist against feminist; women against women. Continue reading »

Oct 122017
 

Star Trek Discovery

The debut of the latest Star Trek series, Discovery, has certainly produced some highly polarized views. It has even generated some controversies that may have more to do with Donald Trump’s “America First” policies than with Discovery’s story itself.

It’s difficult to deny that the strongest reactions to Discovery have been the negative ones – those from fans disappointed with what they saw in the series’ first three episodes – we included. It’s also difficult to deny that whether or not Star Trek Discovery is great entertainment depends upon the eye of the beholder.

But a greater question has arisen, one concerning the Law of Identity: Does Discovery “pass the Star Trek smell test”? Is it “Star Trek”? Are there any objective ways to decide? Does it even matter? Or is this simply another matter to be settled by the “eye of the beholder”?

As a barometer of the times in which its stories were broadcast, the world of Star Trek itself has become increasingly transformed from one of individual rights and individual identity (the hallmarks of a free society) to one of group rights and group identities, with all of the implications that each suggests. Continue reading »

Jun 012017
 

Donald Trump shakes hands with King Salman

Interpret that phrase however you might, but turning words into action has thus far been the hallmark of US president Donald Trump’s administration, and it is applicable to both his business and political style.

To assess the powerfully symbolic impact of Trump’s first presidential visit abroad, Western University’s Associate Professor of Political Science Salim Mansur once again joins us to connect the dots between the events of today and the too-little-remembered history of yesterday.

It was inevitable that “Islam” would become the national and global issue of the day, given the West’s embrace of official multiculturalism.

The ISIS terrorist bombing in Manchester England is but one of the dots connected to Trump’s speech in Saudi Arabia. Another is the history of American and British involvement in having created the conditions in the mid-east that Trump must now confront.

In stark contrast, as Trump fights “Islamization” in America and abroad, Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau continues to pursue policies consistent with the political Islamization of Canada. Continue reading »

May 112017
 

USS Carl Vinson

Despite the establishment media’s continuing hostility to the president, including attempts to paint him as radical and unpredictable, Trump is far more traditional than were his immediate predecessors. That tradition, simply put, is one of acting in his own country’s interests.

“Speak softly and carry a big stick” reflects the Roosevelt foreign policy. It was described by past US president Theodore Roosevelt as “the exercise of intelligent forethought and of decisive action sufficiently far in advance of any likely crisis.”

Amir Farahi of the London Institute and Western University’s Associate Professor of Political Science Salim Mansur join us to share their assessment of what Trump’s early days in office have revealed – both about the president’s foreign policies and about some of the major crisis’ brewing around the globe today.

From America’s actions taken against Assad in Syria, to the bomb dropped in Afghanistan and to movements against North Korea, our conversation connects the dots between what most believe are isolated and unrelated conflicts in distant parts of the globe. Continue reading »