Jan 202019
 

Two recent events, the swearing-in of an American congresswoman on the Quran, and the formation of the Islamist Party of Ontario, have generated numerous conversations about the ultimate meaning and significance of each. Danielle and Robert discover that they have a difference of opinion in that regard.

Citing distinctions between the Qur’an, Islamism, and Sharia Law, Robert suggests that swearing an oath on a document that one personally values is acceptable, since it affirms the ‘veracity’ of the oath. And, he suggests, political Islamists would prefer to run for a party like the Liberal Party, as they already have – not for an ‘Islamist’ Party of Ontario.

In contrast, Danielle argues that the book or document upon which someone swears an oath should represent a set of values shared by the body to which an allegiance is being sworn. She objects to swearing an oath on a book that represents the ‘antithesis’ of what it is supposed to uphold. And, she fears, a party like the Islamist party may have a larger constituency than some expect.

Whatever one’s views on the significance of these developing events, it’s simply not possible to picture any compromise between the basic tenets of the Qur’an, Islamism or Sharia Law – theocracy – and a free society that could ever be Just Right.

Jan 172019
 

Excalibur

‘Democracy’ is a deeply philosophical concept, not just a process of voting or holding elections. In fact, the idea that democracy is simply ‘majority rule’ is an idea destructive to the concept of democracy, while the practice of unlimited majority rule results in consequences that do not lead to anything democratic.

To understand why this is demonstrably so, one must consider the wisdom drawn from the ancient Greeks and Romans whose lexicon of political terms form the roots of the words we use today when discussing politics and government.

It may surprise most people to learn that, despite the popular and accepted use of the terms, words like ‘bureaucracy,’ ‘meritocracy,’ ‘aristocracy,’ ‘plutocracy,’ and ‘minarchy’ (among others) are false and inaccurate concepts. These are ‘garbage words’ explains Paul McKeever in his conversation with Bob, as they review several recognized terms that would be found in an accurate and proper Lexicon of Government.

Bob and Paul bend, twist, and stretch the political concepts of the day in an effort to demonstrate how many of the popular political terms being used today are a major source of political impasses and misunderstanding. And with tongue in cheek, they agree that a ‘minarchy’ is not a kingdom of short people, nor is an ‘idiocracy’ – a society governed by idiots – a literal possibility, despite what many might consider evidence to the contrary. Continue reading »

Jan 132019
 

Are the symbols, artwork, and historic figures that appear on our money always appropriate to the medium? Or do some serve a sinister purpose? Those are just two of the broader questions considered by Danielle and Robert as they reflect on what appears to be more of Justin Trudeau’s political ‘virtue signaling’ on Canada’s currency.

While few would contest the various social advancements that occurred in Canada with regard to racial and sexual issues, they are certainly not unique to this country, nor do they represent the essentials on which the country is based.

Though seemingly only symbolic, the numerous changes to Canadian currency reflect a certain lack of respect for the principles upon which the country was founded. Canada’s essential history is being subtly re-written to destroy the political substance of the nation, and to advance a ‘social history’ based on the current victim culture narrative.

There is a lacking sense of permanence to Canadian currency; it has a ‘disposable look’ and – inflation aside – seems to be treated as such by the Canadian government. As they say, ‘just follow the money,’ though in this case doing so reveals a vision of a planned socialist future, not of a historic past. Fiat money should reflect the geographic (jurisdiction) and political identity (uniting purpose) of a nation, not the propaganda of a given day. Continue reading »

Jan 102019
 

Brand vs Owens

Capitalism as an ‘unknown ideal’ continues to be demonstrated in our popular media and discussion shows daily. Common fallacies about both capitalism and variant forms of socialism persist.

Two recent on-line discussions featuring well-known personalities – one between Russell Brand and Candace Owens, and another between Ben Shapiro and Tucker Carlson – provided perfect samplings of how both those on the ‘left’ and ‘right’ share many of the same anti-capitalistic sentiments. These myths demand a response because when acted upon, undesirable consequences arise for all of us.

‘Capitalism’ has become the word used to describe the economic condition that arises in a political and social environment of freedom. It is the ‘economic dimension’ of freedom and is only made possible when freedom’s other dimensions are in place.

Unfortunately, the word ‘capitalism’ was effectively created by Karl Marx so as to turn the idea of capitalism into a ‘political’ concept, which, unlike socialism, it is not. Whereas capitalism operates on the economic principle of supply and demand (under freedom), socialism operates by fiat. Continue reading »

Jan 092019
 

The failure of the United Nations model of aiding developing countries by doling out money to their governments has failed because it is a top-down model of wealth distribution not unlike the model used, with no success, by the former Soviet Union.

Bangladesh, once called a “basket case” by Henry Kissinger, suffered the same fate as every other country where the government received foreign aid. The aid never reached the people most in need of it.

Nobel Peace Prize recipient Muhammad Yunus of Grameen Bank has demonstrated that micro-lending directly to the people is the best way to break the cycle of poverty. His bottom-up model of capitalism is the success story that is modern Bangladesh.

Salim Mansur, Professor Emeritus of Western University tells the story of that once war-torn and poverty stricken country and how one man, Muhammad Yunus turned it into a prospering nation.

Jan 082019
 


As part of the Global Compact For Migration Canada’s Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau has dutifully offered up $595 million to “sensitize and educate” Canadian media professionals. This buyout will go to “trusted” media outlets selected by journalists hand-picked by the Liberal government.

Salim Mansur, professor emeritus at Western University, explains the implications for such blatant largess, from the independence of a free press to the role Canada under Justin Trudeau is playing in the broader United Nations agenda for a global empire.

Jan 062019
 

Do Not Patreon

Patreon is described by Wikipedia as “a membership platform that provides business tools for creators to run a subscription content service, with ways for artists to build relationships and provide exclusive experiences to their subscribers, or ‘patrons.’”

In 2017, founder and CEO of Patreon, Jack Conte, invented an anti-concept he called ‘Manifest Observable Behavior.’ Intended to distract attention from his own company’s unjust and subjective decisions to remove certain content creators from its platform – based on little more than their expression of views that could be associated with the ‘Right’ – the inherent contradictions in Conte’s use of that term soon became manifest.

The very statement that Patreon’s “decision to remove a creator page has absolutely nothing to do with politics and ideology and has everything to do with Manifest Observable Behavior…” is a manifest admission that it’s all about ideology.

‘Manifest’ means ‘obvious, plainly apparent.’ ‘Observable’ means ‘capable of being observed.’ ‘Behavior’ means ‘the way a person, substance, or machine ACTS under given circumstances.’

Yet no observed ‘action’ on the part of content creators is cited in Patreon’s unannounced ‘de-platforming’ of those content creators. The only ‘action’ observable here is that of Patreon itself. And through its actions, it has demonstrated that it is indeed ‘ideology’ and ‘politics’ that Patreon targets. Continue reading »

Jan 052019
 


Salim Mansur, Professor Emeritus at Western University, explains that the United Nations’ Agenda 2030 is a plan for a post-national world.

It is partly due to the abject failure of the UN’s efforts to bring the Global South into the fold of the developed and industrialized world that has caused a massive movement of people from these failed states northward and westward to the more stable, rich, and democratic states.

Agenda 2030 serves as a blueprint for the European Union and other Western nations to rid themselves of their sovereignty and alter the fundamental nature of their long-established cultures and political institutions in an effort to create a single global empire.